When one door closes...




When one door closes...

I have been thinking about this message for quite some time now. Not really sure what to say, how to say it and how to accept the truth we are living these days. 

We all know the story - Call it Corona call it Covid-19, the virus... you choose. It has changed all of our lives in an instant. 

A mere two weeks ago social distancing became a new and overly used term, and we panicked a bit - no we didnt stock up on toilet paper but the thought of having our two little boys stuck in our little home felt like a nightmare waiting to happen. We had an option where so many didn't. 

"Camping" out on my parents' farm in British Columbia seemed our best option, we would give self sustainable living a try and teach our children about all the things we take for granted in our lives.

We were very nervous, sad and confused about the decision we were making. I had a week to pack up our lives, say goodbye to our friends and family and make peace with the unknown chapter of our lives we were about to enter. 

We set off on a Saturday evening, a 15 hour trip ahead of us and usually when we make the drive we make sure the kiddos will do most of their sleeping on the drive. No asking are we there yet, no car sickness, silence and everyone is happy. 

We were only 2 hours into our drive and we had "trailer trouble", the bearing completely came off of one of the tires and if we were to drive any further we would have lost our haul.

After some debate and a few calls we decided to have faith in humanity and leave the trailer on the side of the highway over night and head back home. A home I already said goodbye to, a home with zero coffee or pyjamas for that matter... nevertheless we were tired and needed the sleep.

We woke up, coffee-less and took on the day with one mission. Get the trailer fixed and get on the road... ya no that didn't happen. Endless trips to get new parts and countless repairs to the trailer and we managed to hit the road on Monday afternoon, slept a few hours in the truck at a rest stop and continued on our journey. 

For the first time since my parents moved to BC the drive was pleasant, no one got car sick, there was very little crying and more laughter than our ears could handle. 

The first week of our "extended stay" revolved around unpacking, settling in and adjusting to the time change... all first world problems of course.

Week two and we are slowly transitioning into our new routine.


 

*Wake up , this involves coffee mainly

*Feed the animals (dogs/cats/sheep/horses/lamas..and the fish)

*Feed ourselves or get fed by the culinary arts student in the house

*School time or Ouma time as the kids call it. She is way more patient than me when it comes to the classroom (must be experience)

*Oh and inbetween there is a ton of snack requests, mainly from Danny, he is always hungry and can't quite put his finger on what he is craving.

*More animals get fed


*If the weather permits we go for walks and if not we catch up with friends and family over facetime. 

*Prepare and have dinner and get ready to take on a new day tomorrow.



 

We make the best of every day. I realized that for the past how ever many years, we took for granted our freedom, and all the luxuries that came with it. Although we are allowed to go to the city and get supplies, we wouldnt want to compromise anyone's health. My parents are both 60 and taking everyone's safety into consideration is our first priority. That said, we will gain a ton of experience and knowledge during this time, by learning how to live off the earth.

I saw a live lamb birth yesterday morning, and although I have seen babies come into the world it gave me a different sense of security, a sense that there is a future, a tomorrow to be enjoyed, but I also know that it will look vastly different than all the yesterday's we have lived and enjoyed. 

 


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